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Publications

Google Scholar Profile: http://scholar.google.com.au/citations?user=OQ3w1l8AAAAJ&hl

2019

65. Willmott NJ, Henneken J, Elgar MA, Jones TM (2019) Guiding lights: foraging responses of juvenile nocturnal orb-weavers to the presence of artificial light at night. Ethology. Accepted 30/1/19

64. Durrant J, Green MP & Jones TM (2019) Artificial light at night impacts immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. Insect Science. First published 2019/2/5

63. McLay LK, Hopkins JP, Wong BM, Candolin U & Jones TM (2019) What effect does light pollution have on animal behavior? A systematic literature review protocol. Environmental Evidence. Accepted 20/1/19.

62. Grose M & Jones TM (2019) Evolving ideas about the impacts of light at night on urban ecosystems. Chapter 13. Handbook of Urban Ecology, second edition, Editor: Ian D Routledge.

2018

61. Willmott NJ, Henneken J, Selleck CJ, Jones TM (2018) Lights in the dark: Artificial light at night alters life history in a nocturnal orb-weaving spider. PeerJ 6: e5599

60. Aulsebrook AE, Jones TM, RA Mulder & Lesku JA (2018) Impacts of artificial light at night on sleep: a review and prospectus Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A. 329 (8-9) 409-418

59. McLay LK, Nagarajan‐Radha V, Green MP, Jones TM (2018) Dim artificial light at night affects mating, reproductive output, and reactive oxygen species in Drosophila melanogaster. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A. 329 (8-9) 419-428

58. Durrant J, Botha LM, Green MP & Jones TM (2018) Artificial light at night prolongs juvenile development time in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B. 330 (4)225-233

57. Hopkins GR, Gaston KJ, Visser ME, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2018) Artificial light at night as a driver of evolutionary change across the urban-rural landscape. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. 16, 472-479

56. Milla L, van Nieukerken EJ, Vijverberg R, Doorenweerd C, Wilcox SA, Halsey M, Young DA, Jones TM, Kallies A, & Hilton DJ (2018) A preliminary molecular phylogeny of shield-bearer moths (Lepidoptera: Adeloidea: Heliozelidae) highlights rich undescribed diversity. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 120, 129-143

2017

55. Henneken J & Jones TM (2017) Pheromones-based sexual selection in a rapidly changing world. Current Opinion in Insect Science. 24: p84-88

54. Henneken J, Goodger JQ, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2017) Variation in the web-based chemical cues of Argiope keyserlingi. Journal of Insect Physiology. 101: p15-21

53. Freelance C, Andersen C, Leone L & Jones TM (2017) A method for paraffin sectioning and identification of indoleamines in the brain of insects with a sclerotised cuticle. Histology. 40:3 p66-72

52. Alavi Y, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2017) Sex versus parthenogenesis; immune function in a facultatively parthenogenetic Phasmatid (Extatosoma tiaratum). Journal of Insect Physiology. 100: p65-70

51.  Henneken J, Goodger JQ, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2017) The potential role of web-based putrescine as a prey-attracting allomone. Animal Behaviour. 129: p205-210

50. McLay L, Green MP & Jones TM (2017) Chronic exposure to dim artificial light at night decreases fecundity and adult survival in Drosophila melanogaster. Journal of Insect Physiology. 100: p15-20

49. Botha LM, Jones TM, & Hopkins GR (2017) Effects of lifetime exposure to artificial light at night on cricket (Teleogryllus commodus) courtship and mating behaviour. Animal Behaviour. 129: p181-188

48. Henneken J, Goodger J, Jones TM, & Elgar MA (2017) Diet-mediated pheromones and signal reliability. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 4: 145

47. Tierney SM, Friedrich M, Humphreys WF, Jones TM, Warrant EJ & Wcislo WT (2017) Consequences of evolutionary transitions in changing photic environments. Austral Ecology. 56:1 p23-46

2016

46. Spiegel CN, Araki AS, dos Santos Dias DB, Hamilton JGC, Brazil RP & Jones TM (2016). Lutzomyia longipalpis, a complex history from the sex pheromone point of view. Parasites and Vectors. 9: p580 DOI: 10.1186/s13071-016-1866-x

45. Aulsebrook AE, Jones TM, Rattenborg NC, Roth II TC & Lesku JA (2016). Sleep Ecophysiology: Integrating Neuroscience and Ecology. Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 31:8 p590–599

43. Alavi Y, Van Rooyen A, Elgar MA, Jones TM, Weeks A (2016). Microsatellite markers show the mechanism of parthenogenesis in Extatosoma tiaratum is automixis with terminal fusion. Insect Science. Jun 27. Epub 2016 Jun 27.

42. Alavi Y, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2016). The role of sperm depletion in maintaining facultative parthenogenesis. Ethology. 122: 7 p523-530. doi:10.1111/eth.12497

2015

41. Durrant J, Michaelides EB, Rupasinghe T, Tull D, Green M & Jones TM (2015). Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in a model invertebrate, the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. PeerJ 3:e1075

40. Henneken J, Jones TM, Goodger JQD, Dias DA, Walter A & Elgar MA(2015).Diet influences female signal reliability for male mate choice. Animal Behaviour. 108: p215–221

39. Ceballos L, Jones TM & Elgar MA(2015).Patterns of sperm transfer in the golden orb-weaver Nephila edulis. Ethology. 121: 6 p617–624

38.  Jones TM, Michaelides EB, Durrant J, & Green M (2015). Melatonin: a possible link between the presence of artificial light at night and reductions in biological fitness. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. 370: 20140122

2014

37.  Jones TM, Fanson K, Lanfear R, Symonds MR & Higgie M (2014). Gender differences in visibility at conferences may be due to female risk-aversion. PeerJ. 2: e627

36.  Bonsignore CP, & Jones TM (2014). Aggregation and mating success of Capnodis tenebrionis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Insect Science. 21: p203-212

1993-2013

35.  Elgar MA, Jones TM & McNamara KB (2013). Promiscuous words. Frontiers in Zoology 10:66

34.  McNamara KB, van Lieshout E, Jones TM & Simmons LW (2013). Age-dependent trade-offs between immunity and male, but not female, reproduction. Journal of Animal Ecology 82: 235–244

33.  Featherston RJ, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2013). Female resistance behaviour and progeny sex ratio in two Bradysia species (Diptera:Sciaridae) with paternal genome elimination. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 26: p919–928

32.  McNamara KB, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2012). A female preference for experienced males in the almond moth, Cadra cautella. Behavavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 66: p1141-1147

31.  Jones TM, Arnqvist A, McNamara KB, and Elgar MA (2012). Size-assortative pairing across three developmental stages in the Zeus bug, Phoreticovelia disparata. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 66: p995-1003.

30.  Davie LC, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2010). The role of chemical communication in sexual selection: hair-pencil displays in the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella. Animal Behaviour. 79: p391-399.

29.  Jones TM, Elgar MA & Arnqvist G (2010) Extreme cost of male riding behaviour for juvenile females of the Zeus bug, Phoreticovelia disparata. Animal Behaviour. 116: p11-16.

28.  McNamara KB, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2010). Adult responses to larval population size in the almond moth, Cadra cautella. Ethology. 116: p39-46.

27.  McNamara KB, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2009). Large spermatophores reduce female receptivity and increase male paternity success in the almond moth, Cadra cautella. Animal Behaviour. 77: p931-936.

26.  Elgar MA & Jones TM (2008). Size-dependent mating strategies and the risk of cannibalism. Biological Journal of the Linnaean Society. 94: p355-363.

25.  Jones TM & Elgar MA (2008). Male insemination decisions and sperm quality influence paternity in the golden orb-weaving spider. Behavioral Ecology. 19: p285-291.

24.  Hale JM, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2008). Sperm quantity explains age-related variation in fertilisation success in the hide beetle. Ethology. 114: p797-807.

23.  McNamara KB, Brown R, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2008). Paternity costs from polyandry compensated by increased fecundity in the hide beetle. Behavavioral Ecology, 19: p433-440.

22.  McNamara KB, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2008). A longevity cost of re-mating, but no benefits of polyandry in the almond moth, Cadra cautella. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 62: p1433-1440.

21.  McNamara KB, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2008). Causes and consequences of variation in female mating frequency in the almond moth, Cadra cautella. Behaviour, 145: p779-793.

20.  McNamara, K. B., Elgar, M. A. & Jones, TM (2008). Seminal compounds, female receptivity, and fitness in the almond moth, Cadra cautella. Animal Behaviour. 76: p771-777.

19.  Arnqvist G, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2007). The extraordinary mating system of Zeus bugs (Heteroptera; Veliidae; Phoreticovelia sp. Australian Journal of Zoology, 55: p131-137.

18.  Johansson BG & Jones TM (2007). The role of chemical signals in sexual selection. Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 82:p265-289. [IF = 10.26; Citations = 206]

17.  Jones TM, Featherston R, Paris DBBP & Elgar MA (2007). Age related sperm transfer and sperm competitive ability in the male hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus. Behavioral Ecology, 18: p251-258.

16.  McNamara KB, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2007). No cost of male mating experience on female reproductive success in the almond moth, Cadra cautella (lepidoptera; Pyralidae). Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 61: p1177-1184

15.  Arnqvist G, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2006). Sex role reversed nuptial feeding reduces male kleptoparasitism of females in Zeus bugs (Heteroptera; Veliidae). Biology Letters. 2: p491-493.

14.  Colvin PGR, Elgar MA & Jones TM (2006). Life-history traits and the mating system of an Australian water strider, Tenagogerris euphrosyne. Australian Journal of Zoology. 54: p107-116.

13.  Jones TM, McNamara KB, Colvin PB, Featherston R & Elgar MA (2006). Mating frequency, fecundity and fertilization success in the hide beetle. Journal of Insect Behavior. 19: p357-371.

12.  Jones TM & Widemo F (2005). What happens when food is scarce: survival & reproduction in a lekking Hawaiian Drosophila. Ecological Entomology. 30: p397-405.

11.  Johansson BG, Jones TM & Widemo F (2005). Cost of pheromone production in a lekking Drosophila. Animal Behaviour. 69: p851-858.

10.  Jones TM & Elgar MA (2004). The role of male age, sperm age and mating history on fecundity and fertilization success in the hide beetle. Proceedings of the Royal Society London B.  271: p1311-1318.

9.   McNamara KB, Jones TM, & Elgar MA (2004). Female reproductive status and mate choice in the hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus. Journal of Insect Behavior. 17: p337-352.

8.   Arnqvist GA, Jones TM & Elgar MA (2003). Sex role reversed nuptial feeding in Zeus bugs. Nature, 424: p387.

7.   Jones TM & Quinnell RJ (2002). Testing predictions for the evolution of lekking in the sandfly, Lutzomyia longipalpis. Animal Behaviour. 63: p605-612.

6.   Mulder RA, Jones TM & Downes S. (2002). Frontiers in sexual selection. Trends Ecol. Evol., 17: 107-108.

5.   Jones TM (2001). A potential cost of monandry in the lekking sandfly, Lutzomyia longipalpis. Journal of Insect Behavior. 14: p385-399

4.   Jones TM, Quinnell R & Balmford A (2000) Adaptive female choice for middle-aged mates in a lekking sandfly. Proceedings of the Royal Society London B. 267: p681-686.

3.   Jones TM, Quinnell R & Balmford A (1998) Fisherian flies: investigating the benefits of female choice in a lekking sandfly. Proceedings of the Royal Society London B. 265: p1651-1657.

2.  Jones TM & Hamilton JGC (1998) A role for pheromones in mate choice in a lekking sandfly. Animal Behaviour. 56: p891-898.

1.  Thomas CD & Jones TM (1993) Partial recovery of a skipper butterfly (Hesperia comma) from population refuges: lessons for conservation in a fragmented landscape. Journal of Animal Ecology. 62: p490-502.


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